5 Reasons Why You Should Knock Down and Rebuild Your Home

29/10/2020 . By Champion Homes

If you’re thinking about buying a new house or performing major renovations, perhaps you could knock down and rebuild your home instead. This solution has continued to gain popularity for more than a decade, according to RealEstate.com.au. Rising lot prices and land scarcity contribute to this trend.

Why Rebuild Your Home?

1. It’s faster and often more economical than completing multiple lengthy renovation projects or building an extension. When you remodel several rooms, the total cost can quickly enter the same price range as a new construction. Rebuilding also eliminates the need to buy a block of land at today’s high prices.

Although you’ll have to disconnect the utilities and request a demolition permit, it doesn’t take very long to knock down an old building. The construction process is also comparatively fast; there’s no need for contractors to work around old materials and fixtures. Homebuilders have developed efficient techniques that they employ when constructing any dwelling.

2. A brand new home won’t require as many repairs as a renovated house. Countless Australians have fixed many different parts of their homes only to encounter further problems. Roofing, pipes, faucets, electrical outlets, cooling systems, carpets, windows, tiles and countertops all eventually need replacement.

A dwelling with entirely new equipment and materials will greatly reduce repair costs for many years to come. You won’t have to suffer from eventual water leaks or windows that become difficult to open and shut. These benefits also boost the resale value of a home more than the alternatives. After all, an extension or remodelling project won’t reduce a house’s age.

3. When you knock down and rebuild your family home, you can banish an old house’s problems without moving elsewhere. This allows you to stay near your current neighbours, friends and relatives. You won’t have to accept a longer commute or make your children switch from one school to another.

Rebuilding doesn’t only eliminate obvious defects, such as a leaky roof. It also banishes hidden problems that you might not have noticed. Examples include asbestos, lead paint, outdated wiring and foundation cracks. When these issues exist, demolition frequently represents a simpler and more cost-effective solution than renovation.

4. Rebuilding gives you the freedom to fully customise your house. In addition to colour selection, you may choose the ideal materials, styles and floor plan.

This solution also lets you make even bigger changes. With local council approval, you could reorient the house for greater energy efficiency. You can construct a bigger or smaller home to suit any changes in the size of your family. Likewise, you’ll be able to specify how many storeys you desire.

5. While nothing is completely predictable, it’s relatively easy to estimate the cost of rebuilding. The price doesn’t vary dramatically from one lot to the next. On the other hand, the expense of an extension or remodel can rise substantially as contractors discover unforeseen problems.

Workers might find that they need to remove hazardous materials, exterminate termites or replace the subfloor in your bathroom. Consequently, the total expense of renovation may become much higher than the original quote. Be sure to keep this in mind when comparing a remodelling quote with a home builder’s estimate.

The bottom line is that rebuilding costs less in the long run and lets you enjoy the benefits of a new house without moving or spending a lot of money on land. If a knockdown and rebuild project seems like the best solution for you, please contact us to get started. Our knowledgeable staff can answer any questions you may have about demolition services, home designs or the build process.

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